Cease and Desist Letter Part 1 Information

For any one person to think that this kind of harassement is “school yard playground bully” kind of harassement. I can assure you this is definitly NOT school yard harassement. This kind of harassement is amped up by about 10,000 times. What a Targeted Individual goes through is Harassement of the “WarKind” This kind of harassement is very literally MEANT TO KILL YOU!!! Meant to Slowly kill you, that is. With the mission being “Seek and Destroy” Covert Ops, Domestic Terrorism. A never-ending nightmare of torment, WHILE AWAKE. War on Homeland, YES YOU HEARD ME RIGHT!! Ya know, I sit here and think to myself, my country sold out on me. But, in reality, it’s been nothing but a facade. A mask full of deception and trickery. When I look back on things, I can hear my momma’s workds ringingclear in my ear. The devil will take evrything you love will twist it up, turn it against you and take it away from you, and make you believe that it was the most grand of all plans. Well, in reality….IT IS!

This section serves as three purposes. First, I’m putting this together as the information part of my “Cease and Desisit” letters. Second, I want to put all the information that I have found all together in one section. Therefore, making it easier to give to the public as an informational piece. Non of this is my work/writings and should be seen as quoting the authors in the articles listed. The only things tha I take credit for in this section is putting it all together and trying to better inform the public, giving out the informaiton that I have gathered in the last 2 years of researching all of this. I would like like to personally thank all of these authors for putting this information out of to be found!

  • Page 1: Legal Definitions
  • Page 2: Other Definitions
  • Page 3: Gang Stalking Phases
  • Page 4: Symptoms of Electronic Harassment and Unhealthy EMF Levels
  • Page 5: Kinds of Torture Endured in Ritual Abuse and Trauma-Based Mind Control

This is going to come in parts because it’s so vast. I am also in the process of working on both letters

  • The cease and desist harassment letter
  • The Cease and desist defamation of character letter
  • I am also working on giving a an exact timeline going back before 2018 dated showing exactly what I have going through everyday and keeps escalating

Showing patterns showing involvement showing the escalation

Saturday with three attempts coming into my door along with three situations that could be looked at as kidnapping situations along with continually charging my card from quote unquote Target showing the continued harassment and terrorism that’s involved

THESE DOCUMENTS THAT I AM MAKING RIGHT NOW WILL BE SENT TO THE BATTERED WOMEN’S SHELTER THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF TEXAS AS WELL AS TO TARGETED JUSTICE AS WELL AS OTHERS.

IF YOU DO NOT CEASE AND DESIST HARASSMENT AND DEFAMATION OF CHARACTER NEXT WILL COME CEASED AND DESIST ORDER FROM THE ATTORNEY

NOW THAT I NEED AN MRI FOR MY BRAIN NOW THAT I HAVE A $1,500 VERIZON BAD CREDIT ON MY CREDIT REPORT AS WELL AS I’VE LOST MY STIMULUS DUE TO THIS SITUATION AS WELL AS LOSING MY HOMES IN THIS SITUATION I WILL ALSO BE ASKING AND DEMANDING FOR DAMAGES TO BE PAID AND THE MEDICAL TO BE PAID AS WELL.

YOU NEED TO CEASE AND DESIST THIS IS TERRORISM ALONG WITH EVERYTHING ELSE AS DEFINED BELOW

Dated April 16, 2021

Michelle T DBA MsRogueSA, MsRogueofSA

msrogue@msrogueofsa.net

NOTE: I WENT DOWN ONE TIME AND ONE TIME ONLY PROTECTING EVERYONE!!! ONE TIME, THAT’S IT!! THIS TIME EVRYONE THAT’S BEEN INVOLVED, IS COMING WITH ME!!! TRYING TO PUT ME UNDER PSYCHOSIS A THIRD TIME FOR THE LAST MONTH…KNOW THIS, I DIE, YOU DIE WITH ME WHEN YOU DEATH PENTALTY, THIS IS TERRORISM. CEASE AND DEASE ALL HARASSMENT AND DEFAMATION OF CHARACTER NOW!!!!

Legal Definitions

Texas Penal Code § 42.07. Harassment

Harassment can take several different forms under Texas lawTexas Penal Code §42.07 states that an individual commits the offense of harassment when he or she acts with intent to harass, embarrass, torment, alarm, abuse or annoy someone else. That’s a pretty broad definition. https://www.criminalattorneyfortworth.com/acts-that-can-lead-to-a-texas-harassment-charge/.

(a) A person commits an offense if, with intent to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, or embarrass another, the person:

(1) initiates communication and in the course of the communication makes a comment, request, suggestion, or proposal that is obscene;

(2) threatens, in a manner reasonably likely to alarm the person receiving the threat, to inflict bodily injury on the person or to commit a felony against the person, a member of the person’s family or household, or the person’s property;

(3) conveys, in a manner reasonably likely to alarm the person receiving the report, a false report, which is known by the conveyor to be false, that another person has suffered death or serious bodily injury;

(4) causes the telephone of another to ring repeatedly or makes repeated telephone communications anonymously or in a manner reasonably likely to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, embarrass, or offend another;

(5) makes a telephone call and intentionally fails to hang up or disengage the connection;

(6) knowingly permits a telephone under the person’s control to be used by another to commit an offense under this section;  or

(7) sends repeated electronic communications in a manner reasonably likely to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, embarrass, or offend another.

(b) In this section:

(1) “Electronic communication” means a transfer of signs, signals, writing, images, sounds, data, or intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic, photoelectronic, or photo-optical system.The term includes:

(A) a communication initiated through the use of electronic mail, instant message, network call, a cellular or other type of telephone, a computer, a camera, text message, a social media platform or application, an Internet website, any other Internet-based communication tool, or facsimile machine;  and

(B) a communication made to a pager.

(2) “Family” and “household” have the meaning assigned by Chapter 71, Family Code.

(3) “Obscene” means containing a patently offensive description of or a solicitation to commit an ultimate sex act, including sexual intercourse, masturbation, cunnilingus, fellatio, or anilingus, or a description of an excretory function.

(c) An offense under this section is a Class B misdemeanor, except that the offense is a Class A misdemeanor if:

(1) the actor has previously been convicted under this section;  or

(2) the offense was committed under Subsection (a)(7) and:

(A) the offense was committed against a child under 18 years of age with the intent that the child:

(i) commit suicide;  or

(ii) engage in conduct causing serious bodily injury to the child;  or

(B) the actor has previously violated a temporary restraining order or injunction issued under Chapter 129A, Civil Practice and Remedies Code.

Texas Penal Code § 42.07 | FindLaw

Harassment As Defined Legally

OBSCENE COMMUNICATION

The act of initiating communication, whether electronically, in writing, or by telephone, and making a proposal, suggestion, comment, or request that is obscene.

THREATENING COMMUNICATION

The act of threatening, whether electronically, in writing, or by telephone, in a way that causes another person to be reasonably alarmed, that acts of bodily injury or felonies will be committed against the person, the person’s family or household, or the person’s property.

FALSE REPORTING

The act of knowingly conveying a false report that someone else has suffered serious bodily injury or death in a way that causes the recipient of the report to be reasonably alarmed.

HARASSMENT BY TELEPHONE

The act of causing a telephone to ring repeatedly, making anonymous phone calls, or intentionally failing to hang up with the intent to harass, embarrass, torment, alarm, abuse, or annoy someone else under reasonable expectations. It can also involve knowingly permitting another person to use the phone under the original person’s control to commit any offense of harassment by telephone.

ELECTRONIC HARASSMENT

The act of sending repeat electronic communications in a way that causes reasonable likelihood that another person will feel harassed, embarrassed, tormented, alarmed, abused, annoyed, or offended.

Cyberbullying and Cyber harassment

First, let’s understand what “cyberbullying” means. Generally, it refers to people using the Internet or social media (via computer or cell phones) to bully, belittle, threaten, harass or otherwise intimidate another person

Texas laws on cyberbullying and cyber harassment are extensive, although no specific groups of people are listed under them. Many such laws only apply to students and can result in punishment that’s strictly school related. But other Texas cyberbullying laws can apply to anyone of any age.

State and Federal Stalking Laws

Although stalking has been a problem for many years, only in this decade has it received adequate attention from lawmakers, policy officials, and law enforcement agencies. In 1990, California became the first state to enact a specific stalking law. Since that time, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted stalking laws. The National Victim Center website provides the most recent text of all state stalking laws.

Less than one third of the states have anti-stalking laws that explicitly cover stalking via the internet. California, for example, only recently amended its statute to cover cyberstalking in order to prosecute a 50-year-old former security guard who pleaded guilty on April 28, 1999 to using the Internet to solicit the rape of a woman who rejected his romantic advances.

Federal law provides some tools to combat cyberstalking. Under 18 U.S.C. 875(c), it is a federal crime, punishable by up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000, to transmit any communication in interstate or foreign commerce containing a threat to injure the person of another. Section 875(c) applies to any communication actually transmitted in interstate or foreign commerce – thus it includes threats transmitted in interstate or foreign commerce via the telephone, e-mail, beepers, or the Internet. This is the statute under which Jake Baker was charged.

The shortcomings of 18 U.S.C. 875 are evident from the dismissal of the Baker case. It is construed to apply only to communications of actual threats; thus it does not apply in a situation where a cyberstalker engaged in a pattern of conduct intended to harass or annoy another (absent some threat). Also, it is not clear that it would apply to situations where a person harasses or terrorizes another by posting messages on a bulletin board or in a chat room encouraging others to harass or annoy another person.

Certain forms of cyberstalking also may be prosecuted under 47 U.S.C. 223. One provision of this statute makes it a federal crime, punishable by up to two years in prison, to use a telephone or telecommunications device to annoy, abuse, harass, or threaten any person at the called number. The statute also requires that the perpetrator not reveal his or her name. See 47 U.S.C. 223(a)(1)(C). Although this statute is broader than 18 U.S.C. 875 — in that it covers both threats and harassment — Section 223 applies only to direct communications between the perpetrator and the victim. Thus, it would not reach a cyberstalking situation where a person harasses or terrorizes another person by posting messages on a bulletin board or in a chat room encouraging others to harass or annoy another person. Moreover, Section 223 is only a misdemeanor, punishable by not more than two years in prison.

The Interstate Stalking Act, signed into law by President Clinton in 1996, makes it a crime for any person to travel across state lines with the intent to injure or harass another person and, in the course thereof, places that person or a member of that person’s family in a reasonable fear of death or serious bodily injury. See 18 U.S.C. 2261A. Although a number of serious stalking cases have been prosecuted under Section 2261A, the requirement that the stalker physically travel across state lines makes it largely inapplicable to cyberstalking cases.

Finally, President Clinton signed a bill into law in October 1998 that protects children against online stalking. The statute, 18 U.S.C. 2425, makes it a federal crime to use any means of interstate or foreign commerce (such as a telephone line or the Internet) to knowingly communicate with any person with intent to solicit or entice a child into unlawful sexual activity. While this new statute provides important protections for children, it does not reach harassing phone calls to minors absent a showing of intent to entice or solicit the child for illicit sexual purposes. https://cyber.harvard.edu/vaw00/cyberstalking_laws.html#:

Texas Stalking Laws By Definition

The crime of stalking

 is defined as a pattern of malicious behavior –– such as repeatedly showing up at an estranged partner’s house after being told to stay away — as opposed to a one-time event. While stalking is often associated with repeatedly following or pursuing someone, stalking can also be characterized by less direct actions, such as repeatedly contacting someone through the mail, phone, or internet. In addition, stalking can take the form of unwanted gifts or messages. The pattern of behavior must cause the victim to fear for his or her safety or well-being in order to be considered stalking.

In Texas, specifically, the law defines stalking as when someone knowingly engages in behavior that someone else would find threatening, and that would cause a reasonable person to be afraid. Stalking is treated as a 3rd degree felony, which means that it is often punishable with a prison sentence. If convicted of another charge of stalking, it is considered to be a 2nd degree felony.

What Is Online Harassment?

Online harassment may involve threatening or harassing emails, instant messages, or posting information online. It targets a specific person either by directly contacting them or by disseminating their personal information, causing them distress, fear, or anger.

Cyberstalking

is a type of online harassment that involves using electronic means to stalk a victim, and generally refers to a pattern of threatening or malicious behaviors.  All states have anti-stalking laws, but the legal definitions vary. Some state laws require that the perpetrator make a credible threat of violence against the victim. Others require only that the stalker’s conduct constitute an implied threat.

Some Examples of Cyber Stalking Include:

  • Sending manipulative, threatening, lewd or harassing emails from an assortment of email accounts.
  • Hacking into a victim’s online accounts (such as banking or email) and changing the victim’s settings and passwords.
  • Creating false online accounts on social networking and dating sites, impersonating the victim or attempting to establish contact with the victim by using a false persona.
  • Posting messages to online bulletin boards and discussion groups with the victim’s personal information, such as home address, phone number or Social Security number. Posts may also be lewd or controversial – and result in the victim receiving numerous emails, calls or visits from people who read the post online.
  • Signing up for numerous online mailing lists and services using a victim’s name and email address.

Definitions of Terrorism

  • Frightening, Terrorisation, Terrorization – the act of inspiring with fear
  • Terrorist Act – The use of extreme fear in order to coerce people
  • Cyber-Terrorism, Cyberwar – An assault on electronic communication networks
  • Domestic Terrorism – terrorism practiced in your own country against your own people

“Whoever commits the offense of cyber terrorism and causes death of any person shall be punishable with death or imprisonment for life, and with fine,” the new law states. In other cases, “he shall be punishable with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to 10 years, or with fine not less than Rs 10 million, or with both”.

Cyber Terrorism Law and Legal Definition

Cyber Terrorism is the premeditated use of disruptive activities, or the threat thereof, against computers and/or networks, with the intention to cause harm or further social, ideological, religious, political or similar objectives, or to intimidate any person in furtherance of such objectives.https://definitions.uslegal.com/c/cyber-terrorism/

Cost Implications of cyber terrorism includes loss of sales during the disruption, intermittent access for business users, loss of intellectual property , costs of forensics for recovery and litigation, loss of critical communications in time of emergency, loss of confidence and credibility in our financial systems, tarnished relationships& public image globally ,strained business partner relationships etc.

https://definitions.uslegal.com/c/cyber-terrorism/

Cybercrimes Law and Legal Definition

Cybercrime includes any type of illegal scheme that uses one or more components of the Internet (chat rooms, email, message boards, websites, and auctions) to conduct fraudulent transactions or transmit the proceeds of fraud to financial institutions or to others connected with the scheme. Cyber crime also applies to generating spam emails, downloading viruses or spyware to computer, harassing another through the Internet, child pornography, and solicitation of prostitution online. Perhaps the most prominent form of cybercrime is identity theft, in which criminals use the Internet to steal personal information from other users.

https://definitions.uslegal.com/c/cybercrimes/

Texas State Laws Defamation of Character

Texas law uses the phrase “defamation of character” to cover incidents in which someone makes a false statement to injure another person’s reputation or imply the person has bad character.

Defamation includes libel, in which such statements are written, and slander, in which such statements are spoken. Texas has two types of defamation actions: defamation per se and defamation per quod. Each have different levels of proof burdens.

A “private figure” is a person who has no public involvement in government or any particular controversy. Private figures do not need to prove the defendant made the defamatory statements with actual malice. It is enough to prove the statements were merely negligent.

https://legalbeagle.com/6363910-constitutes-defamation-character-texas.html

Texas Laws Regarding Threats

If you threaten another person in the state of Texas, you may end up facing criminal charges. https://sharpcriminalattorney.com/blog/violent-crime/texas-laws-regarding-threats/

What Is A Threat?

Under the law, a threat can take many forms. What may seem like a harmless series of words to one person may constitute a very serious threat in the eyes of another person. In general, however, a threat can lead to legal consequences if it meets the following criteria:

  • It makes another person reasonably fear that they will suffer a bodily injury
  • It makes another person reasonably fear for their life
  • It makes another person reasonably fear their property is in danger of harm

So, according to the law, a threat is a statement or a physical action that places another person in a reasonable fear that their safety or the safety of their loved ones or property is in imminent danger of serious harm.

By the legal definition of a threat, a wide array of actions may be considered threatening. There is no legal requirement regarding the actual content of a criminal threat. Any statement or action that makes another person fear for their safety may legally be considered threatening behavior. https://sharpcriminalattorney.com/blog/violent-crime/texas-laws-regarding-threats/

In Texas, a person can be arrested and charged with assault even if they never lay a hand on another person. As long as they make another person reasonably fear for their safety, charges may be filed. https://sharpcriminalattorney.com/blog/violent-crime/texas-laws-regarding-threats/

R I C O

Texas Racketeering and RICO laws administer harsh penalties for violations. For any offense in which a person is engaging in organized criminal activity, the offense is classified as one charge higher than the most serious offense that was committed.

https://statelaws.findlaw.com/texas-law/texas-racketeering-rico-laws.html

The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act is a federal law meant to allow easier prosecution of criminal organizations, but these laws may also apply to other types of suspected criminal conspiracy. Many states, including Texas, have also enacted their own RICO laws. https://www.jlglawoffice.com/blog/2021/02/how-do-rico-charges-work-in-texas/

They say that everything’s big in Texas. Criminal organizations are no exception. Texas racketeering and RICO laws have been developed in order to put a stop to gangs and other kinds of organized criminal activities. The following chart provides an overview of these laws including links to the statute and other relevant information.

What Is Racketeering?

Texas Organized Crime Statute (Penal Code, Title 11, Chapter 71, Section 71.02)

Racketeering is a violation of federal laws and Texas state law. Racketeering is the criminal act of engaging in illegal business or acts run as part of organized crime. RICO (Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organization) laws make it illegal for criminal organizations (i.e. the mafia, or other like-minded criminal organizations) to profit from other legitimate businesses (i.e. extortion) or to run their own legitimate businesses. The goal is to stop the flow of income to criminal organizations that ultimately use the profits to fund their illegal activities.

Example: A criminal organization forced local businesses on a particular street block to make weekly payments to them in exchange for “protection” from crimes against their business such as vandalism or robberies. The “protection” offered is really protection from members of their own organization who, if not paid, would commit crimes against these businesses and threaten their livelihoods.

Depending on the actual crime involved the defenses will vary and are specific to any given crime. Some additional defenses that may be available are:

  • The defendant was not a member of the criminal organization
  • The defendant did not have knowledge that his actions were furthering the agenda of a criminal organization

Pentalities

Texas Racketeering and RICO laws administer harsh penalties for violations. For any offense in which a person is engaging in organized criminal activity, the offense is classified as one charge higher than the most serious offense that was committed. For example, if the crime committed would at its most serious level be a “Class A” misdemeanor, it would be a state jail felony under this law due to the engagement in organized criminal activity. The only exception is that if the charge for the most serious offense would be a first degree felony, it will remain a first degree felony.

Example: If Bob is a member of a crime organization and committed a burglary of a home, he would be charged with a first degree felony since burglarizing a home normally carries a charge of second degree felony.

If the defendant conspired to commit a crime with a criminal organization, the charge will remain the same as the most serious charge offered for the crime the defendant conspired to commit.

Example: As above, if Bob conspired to commit a burglary of a home, but never actually committed the burglary, the charge would be a second degree felony. Since the crime normally carries a charge of second degree felony if committed outside the context of a criminal organization, when placed in the context of a criminal organization, merely conspiring to commit this crime will carry the same charge.

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